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  • AMITIZA (lubiprostone)

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Indications:  AMITIZA is for Chronic Idiopathic Constipation (CIC) in adults, Opioid-Induced Constipation (OIC) in adults with chronic, non-cancer pain, and Irritable Bowel Syndrome with Constipation (IBS-C) in women ≥ 18 years. Effectiveness in patients taking diphenylheptane opioids has not been established.

Indications

AMITIZA is for Chronic Idiopathic Constipation (CIC) in adults, Opioid-Induced Constipation (OIC) in adults with chronic, non-cancer pain, and Irritable Bowel Syndrome with Constipation (IBS-C) in women ≥ 18 years. Effectiveness in patients taking diphenylheptane opioids has not been established.

Dosing and administration

AMITIZA has 3 FDA-approved indications for 3 different patient types3
  • Irritable Bowel Syndrome with Constipation (IBS-C, 8 mcg twice daily) in women ≥ 18 years old
  • Chronic Idiopathic Constipation (CIC, 24 mcg twice daily) in adults
  • Opioid-Induced Constipation (OIC, 24 mcg twice daily) in adults with chronic, non-cancer pain. The effectiveness in patients with OIC taking diphenylheptane opioids (e.g., methadone) has not been established

Dosages for AMITIZA by indication3

Take AMITIZA orally with food and water. Swallow capsules whole and do not break apart or chew. Physicians and patients should periodically assess the need for continued therapy.

IBS-C

Irritable Bowel Syndrome with Constipation in women ≥ 18 years old

8 mcg, twice daily

Pink oval, soft gelatin capsule* imprinted with "SPI" on 1 side

CIC

Chronic Idiopathic Constipation in adults

24 mcg, twice daily

Orange oval, soft gelatin capsule* imprinted with "SPI" on 1 side

OIC

Opioid-Induced Constipation in adults with chronic, non-cancer pain

24 mcg, twice daily

Orange oval, soft gelatin capsule* imprinted with "SPI" on 1 side

*Capsule may not be shown actual size.

Dosing adjustments for patients with IBS-C

For IBS-C patients with severely impaired hepatic function (Child-Pugh Class C), the recommended dose is 8 mcg once daily. If this dose is tolerated and an adequate response has not been obtained after an appropriate interval, doses can then be escalated to full dosing with an appropriate monitoring of patient response. Dosage adjustment is not required for patients with moderately impaired hepatic function (Child-Pugh Class B).3

Dosing adjustments for patients with CIC and OIC

For CIC and OIC patients with moderately impaired hepatic function (Child-Pugh Class B), the recommended dose is 16 mcg twice daily. For patients with severely impaired hepatic function (Child-Pugh Class C), the recommended dose is 8 mcg twice daily. If this dose is tolerated and an adequate response has not been obtained after an appropriate interval, doses can then be escalated to full dosing with an appropriate monitoring of patient response.3

AMITIZA has no restrictions on duration of use for all 3 indications, though the need for continued therapy should be periodically assessed.3

For CIC: based on two 4-week, double-blind studies, a 24-week and two 48-week, open-label extension safety studies. For OIC: based on three 12-week, double-blind studies and a 36-week open-label extension safety study. For IBS-C: based on two 12- to 16-week, double-blind studies and a 36-week open-label extension safety study.

Patient profiles

View profiles of patients who may have one of these conditions.

 

Important Safety Information

AMITIZA (lubiprostone) is contraindicated in patients with known or suspected mechanical gastrointestinal obstruction. Patients with symptoms suggestive of mechanical gastrointestinal obstruction should be thoroughly evaluated by the treating healthcare provider (HCP) to confirm the absence of such an obstruction prior to initiating AMITIZA treatment.

Patients taking AMITIZA may experience nausea. Concomitant administration of food with AMITIZA may reduce symptoms of nausea.

Avoid use of AMITIZA in patients with severe diarrhea. Patients should be aware of the possible occurrence of diarrhea during treatment. Instruct patients to discontinue AMITIZA and contact their HCP if severe diarrhea occurs.

Syncope and hypotension have been reported with AMITIZA in the postmarketing setting and a few of these adverse reactions resulted in hospitalization. Most reports occurred in patients taking 24 mcg twice daily. Patients should be aware that the risk of syncope and hypotension may be increased with concomitant diarrhea, vomiting, or use of medications known to lower blood pressure. Inform patients that syncope and hypotension may occur within an hour of the first dose or subsequent doses of AMITIZA and generally resolve prior to the next dose, but may recur with repeat dosing. Instruct patients to discontinue AMITIZA and contact their HCP if these reactions occur.

Dyspnea may occur within an hour of first dose. This symptom generally resolves within three hours, but may recur with repeat dosing. Instruct patients to contact their HCP if dyspnea occurs. Some patients have discontinued therapy because of dyspnea.

In clinical trials of AMITIZA (24 mcg twice daily vs placebo; N=1113 vs N=316, respectively) in patients with CIC, the most common adverse reactions (incidence > 4%) were nausea (29% vs 3%), diarrhea (12% vs 1%), headache (11% vs 5%), abdominal pain (8% vs 3%), abdominal distension (6% vs 2%), and flatulence (6% vs 2%).

In clinical trials of AMITIZA (24 mcg twice daily vs placebo; N=860 vs N=632, respectively) in patients with OIC, the most common adverse reactions (incidence > 4%) were nausea (11% vs 5%) and diarrhea (8% vs 2%).

In clinical trials of AMITIZA (8 mcg twice daily vs placebo; N=1011 vs N=435, respectively) in patients with IBS-C, the most common adverse reactions (incidence > 4%) were nausea (8% vs 4%), diarrhea (7% vs 4%), and abdominal pain (5% vs 5%).

Concomitant use of diphenylheptane opioids (e.g., methadone) may interfere with the efficacy of AMITIZA.

The safety of AMITIZA in pregnancy has not been evaluated in humans. Based on animal data, AMITIZA may cause fetal harm. AMITIZA should be used during pregnancy only if the potential benefit justifies the potential risk to the fetus. Caution should be exercised when AMITIZA is administered to a nursing woman. Advise nursing women to monitor infants for diarrhea.

Reduce the dosage in CIC and OIC patients with moderate and severe hepatic impairment. Reduce the dosage in IBS-C patients with severe hepatic impairment.

Indications

AMITIZA (lubiprostone) capsules are indicated for the treatment of Chronic Idiopathic Constipation (CIC) in adults and Opioid-Induced Constipation (OIC) in adults with chronic, non-cancer pain (24 mcg twice daily). The effectiveness in patients with OIC taking diphenylheptane opioids (e.g., methadone) has not been established. AMITIZA is also indicated for Irritable Bowel Syndrome with Constipation (IBS-C) in women ≥ 18 years old (8 mcg twice daily).

Please click here for complete Prescribing Information.

Hide references

  1. Data on file. Takeda Pharmaceuticals.
  2. Brandt LJ, Chey WD, Foxx-Orenstein AE, et al; American College of Gastroenterology Task Force on Irritable Bowel Syndrome. Am J Gastroenterol. 2009;104(suppl 1):S1-S35.
  3. AMITIZA (lubiprostone) Prescribing Information. Sucampo Pharma Americas, LLC.
  4. Brandt LJ, Prather CM, Quigley EM, Schiller LR, Schoenfeld P, Talley NJ. Am J Gastroenterol. 2005;100(suppl 1):S5-S21.
  5. Longstreth GF, Thompson WG, Chey WD, Houghton LA, Mearin F, Spiller RC. Gastroenterology. 2006;130:1480-1491.
  6. Drossman DA, Chey WD, Johanson JF, et al. Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 2009;29:329-341.
  7. Johanson JF, Morton D, Geenen J, Ueno R. Am J Gastroenterol. 2008;103:170-177.
  8. Barish CF, Drossman D, Johanson JF, Ueno R. Dig Dis Sci. 2010;55:1090-1097.
  9. Lipecka J, Bali M, Thomas A, et al. Am J Physiol Cell Physiol. 2002;282:C805-C816.
  10. Jentsch TJ, Stein V, Weinreich F, Zdebik AA. Physiol Rev. 2002;82:503-568.
  11. Hall JE. Textbook of Medical Physiology. 12th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Saunders Elsevier; 2011:773-788.
  12. Keely SJ, Montrose MH, Barrett KE. In: Yamada T, Alpers DH, Kalloo AN, Kaplowitz N, Owyang C, Powell DW, eds. Textbook of Gastroenterology. 5th ed. West Sussex, England: John Wiley & Sons Ltd; 2009:330-367.
  13. Data on file. Sucampo Pharma Americas, LLC.
  14. Chey WD, Drossman DA, Johanson JF, Scott C, Panas RM, Ueno R. Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 2012;35:587-599.
  15. Patierno S, Anselmi L, Jaramillo I, Scott D, Garcia R, Sternini C. Gastroenterology. 2011;140:618-626.
  16. Hungin APS, Chang L, Locke GR, et al. Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 2005;21:1365-1375.
  17. Moeser AJ, Nighot PK, Engelke KJ, Ueno R, Blikslager AT. Am J Physiol Gastrointest Liver Physiol. 2007;292:G647-G656.
  18. Cuppoletti J, Malinowska DH, Tewari KP, et al. Am J Physiol Cell Physiol. 2004;287:C1173-C1183.
  19. Camilleri M, Gorman H. Neurogastroenterol Motil. 2007;19:545-552.
  20. Higgins PDR, Johanson JF. Am J Gastroenterol. 2004;99:750-759.
  21. National Digestive Diseases Information Clearinghouse (NDDIC). Constipation (2007).
  22. Furness JB, Nguyen TV, Nurgali K, Shimizu Y. In: Yamada T, Alpers DH, Kalloo AN, Kaplowitz N, Owyang C, Powell DW, eds. Textbook of Gastroenterology. 5th ed. Hoboken, NJ: Wiley Blackwell; 2009:15-36.
  23. Sternini C. Am J Physiol Gastrointest Liver Physiol. 2001;281:G8-G15.
  24. Pappagallo M. Am J Surg. 2001;182:11S-18S.
  25. Brock C, Olesen SS, Olesen AE, Frøkjaer JB, Andresen T, Drewes AM. Drugs. 2012;72:1847-1865.

Important Safety Information

AMITIZA (lubiprostone) is contraindicated in patients with known or suspected mechanical gastrointestinal obstruction. Patients with symptoms suggestive of mechanical gastrointestinal obstruction should be thoroughly evaluated by the treating healthcare provider (HCP) to confirm the absence of such an obstruction prior to initiating AMITIZA treatment.

Patients taking AMITIZA may experience nausea. Concomitant administration of food with AMITIZA may reduce symptoms of nausea.

Avoid use of AMITIZA in patients with severe diarrhea. Patients should be aware of the possible occurrence of diarrhea during treatment. Instruct patients to discontinue AMITIZA and contact their HCP if severe diarrhea occurs.

Syncope and hypotension have been reported with AMITIZA in the postmarketing setting and a few of these adverse reactions resulted in hospitalization. Most reports occurred in patients taking 24 mcg twice daily. Patients should be aware that the risk of syncope and hypotension may be increased with concomitant diarrhea, vomiting, or use of medications known to lower blood pressure. Inform patients that syncope and hypotension may occur within an hour of the first dose or subsequent doses of AMITIZA and generally resolve prior to the next dose, but may recur with repeat dosing. Instruct patients to discontinue AMITIZA and contact their HCP if these reactions occur.

Dyspnea may occur within an hour of first dose. This symptom generally resolves within three hours, but may recur with repeat dosing. Instruct patients to contact their HCP if dyspnea occurs. Some patients have discontinued therapy because of dyspnea.

In clinical trials of AMITIZA (24 mcg twice daily vs placebo; N=1113 vs N=316, respectively) in patients with CIC, the most common adverse reactions (incidence > 4%) were nausea (29% vs 3%), diarrhea (12% vs 1%), headache (11% vs 5%), abdominal pain (8% vs 3%), abdominal distension (6% vs 2%), and flatulence (6% vs 2%).

In clinical trials of AMITIZA (24 mcg twice daily vs placebo; N=860 vs N=632, respectively) in patients with OIC, the most common adverse reactions (incidence > 4%) were nausea (11% vs 5%) and diarrhea (8% vs 2%).

In clinical trials of AMITIZA (8 mcg twice daily vs placebo; N=1011 vs N=435, respectively) in patients with IBS-C, the most common adverse reactions (incidence > 4%) were nausea (8% vs 4%), diarrhea (7% vs 4%), and abdominal pain (5% vs 5%).

Concomitant use of diphenylheptane opioids (e.g., methadone) may interfere with the efficacy of AMITIZA.

The safety of AMITIZA in pregnancy has not been evaluated in humans. Based on animal data, AMITIZA may cause fetal harm. AMITIZA should be used during pregnancy only if the potential benefit justifies the potential risk to the fetus. Caution should be exercised when AMITIZA is administered to a nursing woman. Advise nursing women to monitor infants for diarrhea.

Reduce the dosage in CIC and OIC patients with moderate and severe hepatic impairment. Reduce the dosage in IBS-C patients with severe hepatic impairment.

Indications

AMITIZA (lubiprostone) capsules are indicated for the treatment of Chronic Idiopathic Constipation (CIC) in adults and Opioid-Induced Constipation (OIC) in adults with chronic, non-cancer pain (24 mcg twice daily). The effectiveness in patients with OIC taking diphenylheptane opioids (e.g., methadone) has not been established. AMITIZA is also indicated for Irritable Bowel Syndrome with Constipation (IBS-C) in women ≥ 18 years old (8 mcg twice daily).

Please click here for complete Prescribing Information.